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When we got adopted by a bald guy, I thought this would be more like "Annie" - Myth Happens

Sovay
Date: 2016-01-26 04:06
Subject: When we got adopted by a bald guy, I thought this would be more like "Annie"
Security: Public
Music:Flogging Molly, "The Times They Are A-Changin'"
Tags:patreon

So my niece has a T-shirt with a Minion on it. This was a meaningless piece of pop culture to me until this weekend, when it turns out that Despicable Me (2010) is a startlingly charming children's movie of the kind that can be enjoyed by adults without excess of either irony or fart jokes.1

The title refers to the protagonist Gru, voiced by Steve Carrell with an outrageous Eurosmash accent that is mostly pseudo-Russian but honestly reminds me of nothing so much as the accent Peter Jurasik invented for Londo Mollari on Babylon 5 (1994–1998), in which case there's a healthy dose of the Borscht Belt in its DNA. His character design is equally fantastic: he looks like a cross between Alastair Sim and Uncle Fester, tall and bulky-shouldered with a piercing nose, stalky legs, and caterpillar brows with a toggle setting between glowering and plaintive. On a normal human body, his black drainpipe jeans and matching zip-up jacket would give him a middle-aged geek-chic look, his no-neck delineated by a charcoal-striped scarf; he will freeze-ray any customer who gets between him and his morning coffee. His house cranes over its neighbors like the Addams mansion; the basement is a cavernous space-age hangar occupied by the lab-coated Dr. Nefario (Russell Brand) and a nearly infinite number of knee-high, lemon-yellow Minions (mostly Pierre Coffin, occasionally Chris Renaud and Jermaine Clement) in their little boiler suits and welding goggles. I am not at all surprised that these creatures got their own spin-off. They are not exactly what would happen if you dropped Beaker and the Doozers in a blender, but they possess some of the same mad engineering charm. They chatter away at one another in their own dialect, out of which a recognizable non-English word will occasionally emerge, like a breezy "Da, da, da" after being given instructions; they look almost identical and about half a dozen differentiate themselves by personality over the course of the story, which genuinely impresses me in a digitally animated film. They have boundless enthusiasm and a problematic attention span. They'll build whatever nefarious invention Gru can design, but as the story opens, he's got a problem pure labor can't solve: unlike Goldfinger or Lex Luthor, Gru is not an independently wealthy supervillain. He was formerly responsible for some bold acts of theft and mayhem—and he's got the newspaper clippings to prove it—but these days he's in danger of being outcompeted by younger, flashier, meaner villains with sleeker tech and better PR. Some unknown baddie just replaced the Great Pyramid of Giza with an inflatable replica and it's making "all other villains look lame." Gru wants to prove he's still in the game, but he's taken out so many loans from the Bank of Evil that he can't even get funding for his world-defying plan to steal the moon unless he can convince the bank's pointy-haired president that he's a real threat to international security, not just another minor megalomaniac with a mortgage.

Toward this end, for reasons that play logically in context, he adopts three small orphan girls so that he can steal a shrink ray.

The plot from here on is obvious: unless it's going to play against audience expectation to the point of cruelty, Gru's phony family will have to become the real thing; his reluctant acts of caretaking2 will become heartfelt and the three orphans—who are not exactly pushovers themselves—will find themselves bonding with this awkward, slippery, inadvertently endearing man. This is indeed the arc we get. But it's not saccharine. And just as importantly, neither is it winkingly ironic. The subversive approach works with Edith (Dana Gaier), a gap-toothed, blond-shocked hellion whose pink-striped sweater and pink woolly knit hat do not remotely disguise the fact that she's hit adolescent cynicism about five years ahead of schedule without losing an ounce of childhood bloodthirstiness. When Gru incinerates a rigged carnival game that was about to cheat five-year-old, unicorn-obsessed Agnes (Elsie Fisher) out of a fair and square win, Edith's eyes widen with hero worship. She was already impressed with the number of medieval torture devices and futuristic weapons left casually lying around her new home. But he earns Agnes' trust by finding her a new toy unicorn after her beloved scruffy original is accidentally disintegrated in his kitchen, which is the kind of gesture that can win a child for life even if meant mostly as an expedient remedy for her heartbroken crying, and cusp-of-puberty Margo (Miranda Cosgrove) with her glasses, her sensible plaid skirt, and her hand-me-down tweed jacket is too old and too used to fending for herself and her sisters3 to fall for anything other than real parental commitment. Dolls and explosions are nice, but they're not proof of safety or love or stability. She's the one who could get really hurt by Gru's thoughtless subterfuge; intelligent and defensively sarcastic, she's the one who's most like him. But they are all believable children, which means they are three young girls who aren't adorable tot plot counters—they can be, from moment to moment, any selection or combination of sweet, smart, suspicious, vulnerable, manipulative, imaginative, ungovernable, not constantly in agreement, not necessarily well-behaved, and always lovable. Gru can't figure out how he fetched up on the sidelines of ballet practice surrounded by beaming soccer moms with smartphones who really approve of a father who takes his daughters to dance class, but the viewer could see it coming for miles. They're fantastic kids and he's a supervillain, not an idiot. He has reasons to resist emotional attachment and reasons these particular children get tangled in his heartstrings. The story assumes sincerity when it comes to sentiment and it's stronger for it.

It's also a nice goofy romp through the tropes of supervillainy coupled with some contemporary critique—it doesn't lose time spelling out emotional issues whose implications the audience can already understand because it has to get on with staging a sky chase with a shrink ray or a heist scene with full props to Topkapi (1964) or a pulp sci-fi rocket launch which is also oddly and appropriately earnest. The real villain of the piece is self-monikered up-and-comer Vector (Jason Segal), a track-suited whiz kid with all the smarm and ego of Silicon Valley bro culture; all his inventions have the bland seamlessness of Apple products except where his Bondian fixations show through, like the giant shark circling under the glass floor of his TV room and his insistence on inventing a working piranha gun.4 He is magnetically charmless. He has catchphrases. He probably studies how to be a pick-up artist when he's not designing his own logo. Unfortunately, he's not stupid, just self-centered, entitled, and petty enough to be a real threat: "Now maybe you'll think twice before you freeze someone's head!" Gru can be flamboyantly callous and macabre, but he knows, even if he has to be reminded of it, that people can be hurt. He also knows about gravitation and ballistic trajectories and why it is never a good idea to wear smiley face boxers on a day on which you might plausibly find yourself hanging upside down, with or without a giant shark underneath you. Most scenes in the film are running on more than one level, but when the top layer is the stunts and the gags and the mad science, it is really, reliably funny.

I'd had no idea. Based on casual exposure to trailers and posters at the time, I'd expected Despicable Me to be extruded Pixar-lite product. As it is, I think it would appeal to fans of Noel Streatfeild as much as fans of Brad Bird. Julie Andrews has a small part, but I think she was cast on her ability to sound fantastically unimpressed and she delivers. There is a sequence in an amusement park that is basically an on-ride video for a fictitious roller coaster that I hope somebody had a lot of fun designing, because it starts with a more-than-ninety-degree drop and I would ride it. Also, I recognize that it was designed for 3-D, but I am charmed by the ending gag where two Minions compete to break the fourth wall, refereed by an increasingly exasperated third; when they finally succeed, the "film" smashes, catches, stutters, and melts, leaving a white screen with an immense projected shadow of a Minion who looks awkward for a minute and then starts doing shadow impressions. It's cute at home, but in a theater it would kill. I don't want a Minion T-shirt, but I am seriously considering taking my brother's advice and watching the prequel. This delightful surprise brought to you by my only slightly villainous backers at Patreon.

1. There is one fart joke in the script and it is hilarious. It is immediately lampshaded by an embarrassed mad scientist, trailing off in resignation: "I said dart gun, not . . ." His stalwart but hard-of-hearing research assistant, having just made one of the ubiquitous Muppet-like Minions pass out with a well-aimed shot of artificial intestinal gas, is visibly relieved: "I was wondering under what circumstances we would use this."

2. His first attempt at providing the girls with a nurturing environment is to furnish a corner of the kitchen with a bowl full of candy and some newspapers on the floor. In his defense, it probably worked with the bug-eyed, shark-toothed, bluish-hair-sprouting abomination of science he refers to as his dog. Alternately, it may be why the thing goes for his throat half the time they're alone.

3. I can't actually tell if the girls are meant to be related by blood—Agnes' character design looks East Asian, while Edith and Margo appear to be white. They function as a trio, however, and it is never suggested even by the orphanage's indifferent manager (Kristen Wiig, not quite in Miss Hannigan mode) that they be separated.

4. Later upgraded to a squid gun, with considerably more success.

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Swan Tower: albino owl
User: swan_tower
Date: 2016-01-26 09:57 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Keyword:albino owl

Have you seen Lilo and Stitch? Your commentary on the kids reminded me of Lilo, who strikes me as much more real than most of the moppets I see in films.

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Sovay: Sovay: David Owen
User: sovay
Date: 2016-01-26 10:35 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Keyword:Sovay: David Owen

Have you seen Lilo and Stitch?

Not since it came out, but yes. Lilo is still one of my benchmarks for actual kids in movies.

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shewhomust
User: shewhomust
Date: 2016-01-26 10:22 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)

Trailers consistently seem designed to deter me from seeing their films.

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Sovay: Rotwang
User: sovay
Date: 2016-01-26 10:37 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Keyword:Rotwang

Trailers consistently seem designed to deter me from seeing their films.

Every now and then it works—see Captain America (2011)—but most of the time I agree with you. The movies the studios want to sell me are not the ones I want to see, with the result that I've missed several of the latter in theaters because they look like the former and I am too busy running in the opposite direction.

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asakiyume: Hades
User: asakiyume
Date: 2016-01-26 12:38 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Keyword:Hades

I'm so glad you enjoyed it. We enjoyed it very much too. I thought the scene where the youngest girl is singing herself to sleep with a made-up song was *perfect*--it brought back memories of the same from childhood, and the tunelessness and storytellingness of it were just right.

We liked it so much that we actually bought it and have rewatched it now and then.

Your remark about Vector (He is magnetically charmless.) is such a perfect put-down. It ought to be employed more broadly in society.

Edited at 2016-01-26 12:39 pm (UTC)

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Sovay: Lord Peter Wimsey: passion
User: sovay
Date: 2016-01-26 20:58 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Keyword:Lord Peter Wimsey: passion

I'm so glad you enjoyed it. We enjoyed it very much too.

It's just a wonderful movie! And completely under my radar; nobody even recommended it to me until Charlotte's birthday in December (she had a Minion cake). I'm really happy to see how many people on my friendlist feel the same way.

it brought back memories of the same from childhood, and the tunelessness and storytellingness of it were just right.

Yes. The movie was full of touches like that, which had very little to do with the ways in which small children are conventionally cute in stories and everything to do with the ways in which they are children in real life. I still feel that's stupidly rare.

It ought to be employed more broadly in society.

Thank you! Please feel free to use it whenever the situation demands, with apologies in advance if you encounter situations that demand it.

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Lady Mondegreen: Silly
User: ladymondegreen
Date: 2016-01-26 18:24 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Keyword:Silly

I loved this movie. I somehow managed to see it in theaters (well, I know how, akawil has a knack for finding films I will like) and we now have a plush Minion in residence in our house, for surprising our guests. It came to us by way of a tech conference where literally everyone was given one, and akawil has pictures of dozens of foot-high yellow Minions in conga lines and other configurations all over the conference center.

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Sovay: Lord Peter Wimsey: passion
User: sovay
Date: 2016-01-26 20:38 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Keyword:Lord Peter Wimsey: passion

It came to us by way of a tech conference where literally everyone was given one, and akawil has pictures of dozens of foot-high yellow Minions in conga lines and other configurations all over the conference center.

That's adorable and sounds exactly right.

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moon_custafer: acme
User: moon_custafer
Date: 2016-01-26 18:33 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Keyword:acme

I've been avoiding the prequel because I'm not sure how well the minions would play without Gru, and because the minions appear to have been appropriated as the illustration for every bland joke, and a quarter of the inspirational quotes, that turn up on Facebook: they've Ben turned into this decade's Ziggy.

The sequel, otoh, I watched in the theatre, and it was nice to revisit that universe, but I felt as though it would have worked better as a tv series. There were a number of minor characters who could have used more screen time, and a plot twist I was hoping for never came through. However, it featured a heroine sensible enough to *not* do the usual rom-com thing of misreading a situation and holding a pointless grudge until Act III.

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Sovay: I Claudius
User: sovay
Date: 2016-01-26 20:41 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Keyword:I Claudius

The sequel, otoh, I watched in the theatre, and it was nice to revisit that universe, but I felt as though it would have worked better as a tv series.

That's a really interesting criticism. So you were fine with the basic plot, just not with how quickly it all went by?

However, it featured a heroine sensible enough to *not* do the usual rom-com thing of misreading a situation and holding a pointless grudge until Act III.

Oh, thank God. Even if I never see the movie, I'm glad to hear it. I can't stand that trope and I rejoice whenever a narrative has no time for it.

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moon_custafer
User: moon_custafer
Date: 2016-01-26 22:35 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)

The basic plot was ok. There was a character I thought for sure was a red herring who turned out to be the villain after all, so I was a little disappointed. The various characters got separated in the various plot threads, which is another reason why I would have liked to see it play out over a tv season rather than one movie.

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Alexx Kay
User: alexx_kay
Date: 2016-01-27 02:15 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)

I actually saw the prequel first, and they worked just fine.

(My wife now sometimes speaks in minionese.)

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movingfinger
User: movingfinger
Date: 2016-01-26 19:10 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)

The three orphan girls + scientist makes me think of the Powerpuffs.

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Sovay: Rotwang
User: sovay
Date: 2016-01-26 20:35 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Keyword:Rotwang

The three orphan girls + scientist makes me think of the Powerpuffs.

I'm aware of the existence and the general look of The Powerpuff Girls, but I never watched the show. Do you recommend it?

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movingfinger
User: movingfinger
Date: 2016-01-26 20:47 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)

Nnngngngn.... If you had time to watch animation, I think you should skip Powerpuff Girls and watch Steven Universe.

The Powerpuffs are interesting but the show doesn't run with the development. Steven Universe does. Steven's mother is an alien, a Gem, Rose Quartz. Steven is beginning to find his own Gem capabilities. His mother is no longer around and he lives with his dad, who is the most realistic dad I've seen on TV in ages. And there are other Gems around guiding and protecting him.

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Sovay: Cho Hakkai: intelligence
User: sovay
Date: 2016-01-26 20:50 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Keyword:Cho Hakkai: intelligence

If you had time to watch animation, I think you should skip Powerpuff Girls and watch Steven Universe.

I am watching Steven Universe. I'm just stuck waiting for the next batch of episodes like everyone else after the latest StevenBomb. It's brilliant.

(I am also stuck waiting for the finale of Gravity Falls. My life in TV animation is very frustrating.)

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Kat, most of the time anyway
User: kdsorceress
Date: 2016-01-28 02:48 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)

I was exactly target age for CN's Cartoon Cartoons (Powerpuff Girls, Dexter's Lab, Ed Edd and Eddy, Johnny Bravo...) and so absolutely you should watch the powerpuff girls, it's the best thing to ever have been on television!!!!!!

But realistically, and sans nostalgia...I'd say ask around, watch what people tell you are the best few episodes, and don't worry about catching the whole thing --each episode tends to be fairly standalone.

(Also if you're gonna watch any of that batch, Dexter's Lab was The Best, because mad science and ballerinas.)

~Sor

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martianmooncrab: pic#59898509
User: martianmooncrab
Date: 2016-01-26 20:27 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Keyword:pic#59898509

the Purple Minions from D2 are my favorites.

The Kidlet loves her minions, and I have given her many tshirts with them on it, but her fave shirt is the one that says "It Wasnt Me"

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Sovay: Rotwang
User: sovay
Date: 2016-01-26 20:36 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Keyword:Rotwang

The Kidlet loves her minions, and I have given her many tshirts with them on it, but her fave shirt is the one that says "It Wasnt Me"

Nice!

My family refers to small children as "kidlets," too. I think of it as starting with my grandparents.

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martianmooncrab
User: martianmooncrab
Date: 2016-01-26 20:49 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)

My Dad used to call me Da Kid when I was a teenager, harking back to the nicknames days of criminals and hustlers... grin, and so when I got the Grand Niece, and she wasnt quite a proto human, I started to call her The Kidlet. Daddy would have approved.

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Dr. Kvetch
User: rose_lemberg
Date: 2016-01-26 20:31 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)

I loved this movie and it was great to read your review.
I could not stand the sequel and avoided the prequel.

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Sovay: Rotwang
User: sovay
Date: 2016-01-26 20:34 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Keyword:Rotwang

I loved this movie and it was great to read your review.

Thank you!

I could not stand the sequel and avoided the prequel.

I am planning to avoid the sequel; my brother didn't think it was as good and the one piece of information I've heard about the plot I am resolutely ignoring. He liked the prequel (and my niece loves it, because it is full of Minions), but I'm hearing more ambivalent things from my friendlist.

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drwex
User: drwex
Date: 2016-01-26 20:50 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)

+1 on both of these. This review was nearly as fun as the movie and I agree that it only went downhill from here. In particular the sequel seemed to be NUTHING but juvenile fart jokes and seemed to have lost 80% of the sense of what made the original fun, funny, and memorable.

I completely believe that Gru's voice is a Molari tribute - I thought so at the time. The movie contains enough other obvious references and tribute nods I'd believe it was intentional.

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Sovay: Rotwang
User: sovay
Date: 2016-01-26 22:04 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Keyword:Rotwang

This review was nearly as fun as the movie

That's a compliment!

In particular the sequel seemed to be NUTHING but juvenile fart jokes and seemed to have lost 80% of the sense of what made the original fun, funny, and memorable.

Oh, dear. One of the things I liked best about the sole fart joke in Despicable Me was Gru and Dr. Nefario's mutually mortified look of let us never speak of this again.

The movie contains enough other obvious references and tribute nods I'd believe it was intentional.

What did you spot?

Edited at 2016-01-26 10:04 pm (UTC)

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drwex
User: drwex
Date: 2016-01-26 22:08 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)

Ooh, it's been a while so I'd have to go back. Buck Rogers and James Bond I'm quite sure of. Man from UNCLE I think. I have a memory that there was a pretty clear Star Trek-ian but but I can't swear to that without re-watching.

My kids are totally Minion-obsessed. They thought the fart-joke film was hilarious; the adults were much more "meh" about it.

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drwex
User: drwex
Date: 2016-01-26 22:14 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)

OK I did a little Web searching and apparently there's a Seuss/Lorax tribute in there, a Dilbert reference, and an obvious Godfather reference (horse in the bedsheets) that I totally missed.

According to IMDB "Steve Carell describes Gru's accent as a cross between Ricardo Montalban and Bela Lugosi." Make of that what you will.

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Josh
User: schreibergasse
Date: 2016-01-26 20:42 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)

Huh! I watched the beginnings of Minions and was underimpressed, but I may have to watch this one with Peter.

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Sovay: Rotwang
User: sovay
Date: 2016-01-26 21:03 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Keyword:Rotwang

I watched the beginnings of Minions and was underimpressed, but I may have to watch this one with Peter.

I really recommend it!

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gwynnega: coffee poisoninjest
User: gwynnega
Date: 2016-01-26 21:41 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Keyword:coffee poisoninjest

That does sound delightful, and way more interesting than the trailer made it seem!

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Sovay: Rotwang
User: sovay
Date: 2016-01-26 21:49 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Keyword:Rotwang

That does sound delightful, and way more interesting than the trailer made it seem!

I think it must have succeeded on critical merits and word of mouth, because if the trailer had hinted at the kind of movie Despicable Me actually was, I'd have seen it in theaters five years ago.

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selidor
User: selidor
Date: 2016-01-26 23:19 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)

This one was an awful lot of fun, and I retain a soft spot for it.

Agreed the sequel failed on multiple levels (it did retain a few good minions moments, but otherwise meh). The minions-only prequel has the odd problem of feeling like two movies glued together poorly: a find-the-mcguffin happily-ever-after, which does have some fun set-pieces, and then a peculiar segue into actually-not-funny-enough jokes about the US view of Britain. Better than the sequel, but only watchable if one's brain is direly in need of cute animation silliness.

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Sovay: Rotwang
User: sovay
Date: 2016-01-26 23:43 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Keyword:Rotwang

This one was an awful lot of fun, and I retain a soft spot for it.

I am delighted by the number of people popping out of the woodwork to approve this movie!

Agreed the sequel failed on multiple levels (it did retain a few good minions moments, but otherwise meh).

I really am not planning to see it. (What are the good Minion moments?)

The minions-only prequel has the odd problem of feeling like two movies glued together poorly: a find-the-mcguffin happily-ever-after, which does have some fun set-pieces, and then a peculiar segue into actually-not-funny-enough jokes about the US view of Britain.

Hmmm.

To be honest, I assumed while watching Despicable Me that Gru had invented the Minions: for a supervillain who stole the Times Square Jumbotron ("You all like watching football on that, huh?") and the Eiffel Tower ("The small one from Las Vegas"), they seemed about the right blend of grandiose vision and eccentric reality.

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selidor
User: selidor
Date: 2016-01-26 23:57 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)

Hmm, it's been a few years...there was a slapstick with a banana, which I think was in the sequel.

The Minion backstory is actually quite delightful: they are utterly ancient and entirely irrepressible. It's hard to beat a T-rex falling into a volcano.

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Tim Lieder: Maggie
User: marlowe1
Date: 2016-01-27 04:21 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Keyword:Maggie

I just saw Minions and I was not impressed. The beginning where the Minions kept accidentally killing their bosses was quite fun, but once it settled into a plot with the supervillian trying to steal the crown jewels (and the crown itself), she was nowhere near as compelling as she should have been and when Gru shows up at the very end for about a minute, it reminded me of The Lazarus Effect (where the evil risen-from-the-dead woman after killing everyone resurrects her scientist boyfriend) in that the ending represented the movie that I wanted to see all along.

I was ok with the sequel. I don't remember much about it except it had more Gru interaction with the kids and there were some great mall scenes but I enjoyed it enough to recommend.

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Erik Amundsen
User: cucumberseed
Date: 2016-01-27 15:11 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)

I've not seen it, despite hearing its praises for quite some time. I should try to find the time and a copy...

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Sovay: Rotwang
User: sovay
Date: 2016-01-27 19:34 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Keyword:Rotwang

I should try to find the time and a copy...

Ours came very handily from Netflix!

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Kat, most of the time anyway
User: kdsorceress
Date: 2016-01-28 02:26 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)

But alas, not the streaming version of Netflix (I didn't even get through the first paragraph of your review before I went and checked)

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Sovay: I Claudius
User: sovay
Date: 2016-01-28 05:58 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Keyword:I Claudius

But alas, not the streaming version of Netflix (I didn't even get through the first paragraph of your review before I went and checked)

I'm sorry! That seems to me a major oversight on Netflix's part.

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Kat, most of the time anyway
User: kdsorceress
Date: 2016-01-28 02:41 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)

I loved this movie! I love fluffy dads-and-daughters fiction so much! I love mad science, and I love found families, and gosh, but this was just such a fun thing to watch!

(The sequel is devastatingly disappointing (tropes I hate: anything that reeks of fathers owning their daughters and therefore not letting them date, romance plots where there don't need to be romance plot). I have not seen Minions (or any of them? Are there more than one?) and have worked enough with small children that I don't really want to.)

I do not know if you like fanfic, but there is a wonderful piece that serves as an excellent "what happens next" over at Ao3. It is called From Degas to Vegas and involves Gru trying to go straight, while his little girls cackle and become ever more villainous.

If you are going to read it (please do, it's short and lovely!), I only ask that when Margo describes the Degas she wants so much, you picture Green Dancers. I saw it last summer at the Chicago Art Institute and it may well be the painting that made me understand why people spend thousands and thousands of dollars on Art. Oh it's beautiful, but alas, I don't have a supervillain for a father...

~Sor

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Sovay: Rotwang
User: sovay
Date: 2016-01-28 06:09 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Keyword:Rotwang

I loved this movie! I love fluffy dads-and-daughters fiction so much! I love mad science, and I love found families, and gosh, but this was just such a fun thing to watch!

It was the heartwarming children's mad science family comedy I didn't realize I was waiting for.

I do not know if you like fanfic, but there is a wonderful piece that serves as an excellent "what happens next" over at Ao3. It is called From Degas to Vegas and involves Gru trying to go straight, while his little girls cackle and become ever more villainous.

That sounds delightful; thank you. I have no plans to see the sequel, since I am also not a fan of the overprotective father shtick or mainstream-requisite romances, so will cheerfully accept alternate versions of the characters' future while considering the first movie a satisfactory self-contained canon.

I saw it last summer at the Chicago Art Institute and it may well be the painting that made me understand why people spend thousands and thousands of dollars on Art. Oh it's beautiful, but alas, I don't have a supervillain for a father...

It is lovely. Maybe someday you can be a supervillain and afford it yourself.

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Selkie
User: strange_selkie
Date: 2016-02-01 23:38 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)

We are in a weird position with that film; both moms enjoyed it, Child had serious issues with parenting/ownership/adoption tropes in film/getting returned to an orphanage that make me wonder whether she has inherited N's capacity for meta-reasoning about film.

She does inexplicably and irrevocably love minions, those subverbal bananafreak creatures.

HI. I SEE YOU ARE ALIVE.

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Sovay: Sovay: David Owen
User: sovay
Date: 2016-02-03 03:49 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Keyword:Sovay: David Owen

We are in a weird position with that film; both moms enjoyed it, Child had serious issues with parenting/ownership/adoption tropes in film/getting returned to an orphanage that make me wonder whether she has inherited N's capacity for meta-reasoning about film.

I see no reason not to believe it; all evidence indicates your child has excellent narrative capabilities. That's neat and I can see how it could have been awkward.

HI. I SEE YOU ARE ALIVE.

I am not dead! Hoping you are the same!

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